Conversation sur Wrisris, Le maître des enfers


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*Ba nēk m-vit min na sur / kak am̄o, am̄o, ra ta Lkon va-vvōr, ra sul ta Lkon?*
Am̄o, ra sul ta Lkon va-vvōr.
La sur, kak i tsik s-mat, na s-van sag na s-van sur Wrisris, kmār s-van le va nen̄, Wrisris ron̄: “Tuan̄ gēn sa m-mat le. La nēr / tuar tdun a-vre m-wōr ni.” Na s-van kēl ma na s-wōr bas nēr o si tdun nen̄.
M̄rag nēr le gvur sutwal ak nēr – bul-vēs? Bul-san̄vul le –
Na s-wōr bas nēr nēr s-mat.
Titi m-daw tm̄a a Lkon sa, dek gēn nēk s-tek tm̄a Lkon sa, tm̄a s-vēs wor nok.
Dek gēn t-bon̄ galāg gēn nok dek ti. Am̄o, m-van ma o tdun obek.
Sur o wōr gēn sa le.
Na s-van sag na s-vārus, m-mat wor mi o sm̄an, va-wē.
La kak m-wōr, ti na s-van kēl ma na s-wōr kēl ra sē sa ka nēr ka m-wōr na / Na s-ram kēl wor ra titsik nen̄ sa nēr ka m-wōr ni.
Vetm̄e dek gēn le.
*Titi ra ta Lkon nēr me-tger?*
Tawe tdun a Lkon sa, m-bas. Nēr (ka) m-mat bas.
*Ave? Kēl ave? Kēl barbar?*
Me-qtēg ka / me-qtēg aē sa, m-van tm̄e seg; van wālōg Lkon.
Nēk s-van a Lkon sa nēk s-tek o tētne gvur olbaot, le m̄ōs, sur kēlkēl sur le m̄ōs sa, nēk s-tek o tētne vre sur le m̄ōs gēs sēg, o tdun t-aē gēn nen̄ m-mat bas le.
La m-van ma aqri, ti dek gēn tm̄a t-bon̄ galāg kēl ti.
La am̄o va, o tdun m-bas nok.
*Ba Wrisris sa, ni m-togtog mumul?*
Ni m-togtog mumul.
*M-bas, ni me-tger mlē? ni me-tger [nan̄ēs]?*
Ni me-tger a Bētās, le mon o vre.
*Sur sa?*
Ni m-mat.
*Ni m-mat. Sē m-wōr nē?*
Bek. Ni m-mat wor srēg ka, ni me-tmarga, ni so mat.
La ni m-tog, ni m-tog ni m-tog ni m-tog mumul! O taw va-bon̄ va-bon̄ soqsoq.
O tdun t-wotwot wōn wor ni ti, t-mat ti, Wrisris t-tog ti.
Avvan, ni m-tog avvan, me-tmarga rōrōw ni so mat.
*Ba ni so mat, ra wed / ratle wed m-van nok ma, le?*
Ratle Wetman / ratle tdun wedwed, m-van nok ma.
Ra dōn t-van dēn̄ t’ gin ni.
Tuar qōn̄, nēk s-van sag kak ni obek, m̄rag tuar o tdun vi-lwo rōw ka t-tog t’ aē.
T-van dēn̄ t’ gin ni, ron̄ “Ni obek sa! Ni m-van le vara Wetman.”
M̄rag le susrig ka nami Wrisris ron̄, Wrisris dēn̄ ta Ostrelia.
Ostrelia arās, Wrisris t-van ti ni t-van aksavm̄ag ti?
O plēn obek, sur s-la ni s-van, nēr s-tek tēmē kak ni s-van lul a mke ak.
Wrisris ni tuar tdun sa – ni o tdun la, tuar qōn̄ ni s-van nēk te tek late ni ni t-van ti.
Tuar qōn̄ nēr s-van kēl sag nēr s-mōl kēl ma ron̄ “Wrisris m-mōl kēl nok ma!”
*Nē m-van ma ave? Nē ta Lkon? (i Wrisris)*
Wrisris ni ta Lkon, ni m-wot a Lkon: a Mke-Grāt, a tāvtēn t-aē.
Le qōtgi grāt, o grāt a mken, aa? a tāvtēn t-aē. Namon o tne vre a tāvtēn t-aē.
Ni s-togtog, nintēg tuar o wasn̄in a Diwtag.
*Diwtag?*
Diwtag. Na ssa tuar o wasn̄in. O tne vre aē. Diwtag.
*Va-wē wor. Va-wē adad!*
[AF] Did you say that in the old days, Gaua had a huge population?
[CM] Oh yes, in the old days, the island of Gaua had a huge population.
But then, should my brother die, I’d walk in and go see Wrisris; I’d walk with him to that place in there, and he’d say “That brother of yours is dead. Someone in the village killed him.” And then I would immediately come back and kill him with all his descendants.
Imagine how many there were in each family – how many people? ten, perhaps?
But then I’d use sorcery and wipe them all out.
And this is how here on Gaua, if you look around here on Gaua, you can see there aren’t many people left.
Well, right now, we have come back to a decent number. But before this, we had reached a point where people had almost disappeared.
And the reason for this was black sorcery.
For if I walked in and enquired, if it turned out the death was just due to sickness, that was fine.
But then if it was sorcery, then I’d come back and cast spells back on those who had killed me / I’d avenge my brother who was murdered that way.
That’s how it was.
[AF] Is that what caused the depopulation of Gaua?
[CM] Many people died on this island of Gaua. They all disappeared.
[AF] Where exactly? On the east coast?
[CM] It started here, and then went on and on all around the island.
If you walk around Gaua, you’ll see remains of houses everywhere in the bush; if you follow the traces in the bush, you’ll see traces of entire villages scattered around: those were the people who disappeared in those times.
Nowadays it’s different, our numbers have picked up again a little.
But in the past, we did go through massive losses.
[AF] So that Wrisris, did he live long?
[CM] Oh yes, he lived very long.
[AF] So then he died? Where did he die?
[CM] He passed away by lake Betaas, where he had lived.
[AF] Why?
[CM] He died.
[AF] Oh, he died. Was he murdered?
[CM] No, no. He just died a natural death: he had become old, and then he died.
But before that, he had lived for a very, very long time. For many many years.
For generations and generations, Wrisris was present when people were born, and still present when they died.
He lived all this time, for very very long, until he became so old that he finally passed away.
[AF] When he died, had White people already come here?
[CM] Yes. Some White people had already come here.
Some of them even had visited him personally.
Certain days, you would go up and not find him; instead, his place would be taken by some important chief.
You’d walk all the way to that chief, who would tell you “Wrisris is not here. He’s gone to the land of the White.”
That’s a well known story, that Wrisris went all the way to Australia.
Australia is very far, so how could Wrisris even go there?
There was no plane that he could fly in then. And nobody ever saw him on a ship!
That’s the sort of person Wrisris was. He was just a man, but some days he would just become invisible and travel.
And then another day, people would walk back up there, and returning to the village they’d say “Wrisris is back!”
[AF] Where was Wrisris from? Was he a native of Gaua?
[CM] Wrisris was from Gaua, he was born on Gaua: on the Ghraat volcano, just underneath it.
You see the volcano rising high above, right? well, he was born underneath, at the foot of the hill. His place is at the foot of the volcano.
More precisely, he lived in a place called Diwtagh.
[AF] Diwtagh?
[CM] Diwtagh. It’s the name of a place. It used to be a village. Diwtagh.
Great. Thank you!
S1 stop écouterAF:
*Ba nēk m-vit min na sur / kak am̄o, am̄o, ra ta Lkon va-vvōr, ra sul ta Lkon?*

[AF] Did you say that in the old days, Gaua had a huge population?

S2 stop écouterCM:
Am̄o, ra sul ta Lkon va-vvōr.

[CM] Oh yes, in the old days, the island of Gaua had a huge population.

S3 stop écouter
La sur, kak i tsik s-mat, na s-van sag na s-van sur Wrisris, kmār s-van le va nen̄, Wrisris ron̄: “Tuan̄ gēn sa m-mat le. La nēr / tuar tdun a-vre m-wōr ni.” Na s-van kēl ma na s-wōr bas nēr o si tdun nen̄.

But then, should my brother die, I’d walk in and go see Wrisris; I’d walk with him to that place in there, and he’d say “That brother of yours is dead. Someone in the village killed him.” And then I would immediately come back and kill him with all his descendants.

S4 stop écouter
M̄rag nēr le gvur sutwal ak nēr – bul-vēs? Bul-san̄vul le –

Imagine how many there were in each family – how many people? ten, perhaps?

S5 stop écouter
Na s-wōr bas nēr nēr s-mat.

But then I’d use sorcery and wipe them all out.

S6 stop écouter
Titi m-daw tm̄a a Lkon sa, dek gēn nēk s-tek tm̄a Lkon sa, tm̄a s-vēs wor nok.

And this is how here on Gaua, if you look around here on Gaua, you can see there aren’t many people left.

S7 stop écouter
Dek gēn t-bon̄ galāg gēn nok dek ti. Am̄o, m-van ma o tdun obek.

Well, right now, we have come back to a decent number. But before this, we had reached a point where people had almost disappeared.

S8 stop écouter
Sur o wōr gēn sa le.

And the reason for this was black sorcery.

S9 stop écouter
Na s-van sag na s-vārus, m-mat wor mi o sm̄an, va-wē.

For if I walked in and enquired, if it turned out the death was just due to sickness, that was fine.

S10 stop écouter
La kak m-wōr, ti na s-van kēl ma na s-wōr kēl ra sē sa ka nēr ka m-wōr na / Na s-ram kēl wor ra titsik nen̄ sa nēr ka m-wōr ni.

But then if it was sorcery, then I’d come back and cast spells back on those who had killed me / I’d avenge my brother who was murdered that way.

S11 stop écouter
Vetm̄e dek gēn le.

That’s how it was.

S12 stop écouterAF:
*Titi ra ta Lkon nēr me-tger?*

[AF] Is that what caused the depopulation of Gaua?

S13 stop écouterCM:
Tawe tdun a Lkon sa, m-bas. Nēr (ka) m-mat bas.

[CM] Many people died on this island of Gaua. They all disappeared.

S14 stop écouterAF:
*Ave? Kēl ave? Kēl barbar?*

[AF] Where exactly? On the east coast?

S15 stop écouterCM:
Me-qtēg ka / me-qtēg aē sa, m-van tm̄e seg; van wālōg Lkon.

[CM] It started here, and then went on and on all around the island.

S16 stop écouter
Nēk s-van a Lkon sa nēk s-tek o tētne gvur olbaot, le m̄ōs, sur kēlkēl sur le m̄ōs sa, nēk s-tek o tētne vre sur le m̄ōs gēs sēg, o tdun t-aē gēn nen̄ m-mat bas le.

If you walk around Gaua, you’ll see remains of houses everywhere in the bush; if you follow the traces in the bush, you’ll see traces of entire villages scattered around: those were the people who disappeared in those times.

S17 stop écouter
La m-van ma aqri, ti dek gēn tm̄a t-bon̄ galāg kēl ti.

Nowadays it’s different, our numbers have picked up again a little.

S18 stop écouter
La am̄o va, o tdun m-bas nok.

But in the past, we did go through massive losses.

S19 stop écouterAF:
*Ba Wrisris sa, ni m-togtog mumul?*

[AF] So that Wrisris, did he live long?

S20 stop écouterCM:
Ni m-togtog mumul.

[CM] Oh yes, he lived very long.

S21 stop écouterAF:
*M-bas, ni me-tger mlē? ni me-tger [nan̄ēs]?*

[AF] So then he died? Where did he die?

S22 stop écouterCM:
Ni me-tger a Bētās, le mon o vre.

[CM] He passed away by lake Betaas, where he had lived.

S23 stop écouterAF:
*Sur sa?*

[AF] Why?

S24 stop écouterCM:
Ni m-mat.

[CM] He died.

S25 stop écouterAF:
*Ni m-mat. Sē m-wōr nē?*

[AF] Oh, he died. Was he murdered?

S26 stop écouterCM:
Bek. Ni m-mat wor srēg ka, ni me-tmarga, ni so mat.

[CM] No, no. He just died a natural death: he had become old, and then he died.

S27 stop écouter
La ni m-tog, ni m-tog ni m-tog ni m-tog mumul! O taw va-bon̄ va-bon̄ soqsoq.

But before that, he had lived for a very, very long time. For many many years.

S28 stop écouter
O tdun t-wotwot wōn wor ni ti, t-mat ti, Wrisris t-tog ti.

For generations and generations, Wrisris was present when people were born, and still present when they died.

S29 stop écouter
Avvan, ni m-tog avvan, me-tmarga rōrōw ni so mat.

He lived all this time, for very very long, until he became so old that he finally passed away.

S30 stop écouterAF:
*Ba ni so mat, ra wed / ratle wed m-van nok ma, le?*

[AF] When he died, had White people already come here?

S31 stop écouterCM:
Ratle Wetman / ratle tdun wedwed, m-van nok ma.

[CM] Yes. Some White people had already come here.

S32 stop écouter
Ra dōn t-van dēn̄ t’ gin ni.

Some of them even had visited him personally.

S33 stop écouter
Tuar qōn̄, nēk s-van sag kak ni obek, m̄rag tuar o tdun vi-lwo rōw ka t-tog t’ aē.

Certain days, you would go up and not find him; instead, his place would be taken by some important chief.

S34 stop écouter
T-van dēn̄ t’ gin ni, ron̄ “Ni obek sa! Ni m-van le vara Wetman.”

You’d walk all the way to that chief, who would tell you “Wrisris is not here. He’s gone to the land of the White.”

S35 stop écouter
M̄rag le susrig ka nami Wrisris ron̄, Wrisris dēn̄ ta Ostrelia.

That’s a well known story, that Wrisris went all the way to Australia.

S36 stop écouter
Ostrelia arās, Wrisris t-van ti ni t-van aksavm̄ag ti?

Australia is very far, so how could Wrisris even go there?

S37 stop écouter
O plēn obek, sur s-la ni s-van, nēr s-tek tēmē kak ni s-van lul a mke ak.

There was no plane that he could fly in then. And nobody ever saw him on a ship!

S38 stop écouter
Wrisris ni tuar tdun sa – ni o tdun la, tuar qōn̄ ni s-van nēk te tek late ni ni t-van ti.

That’s the sort of person Wrisris was. He was just a man, but some days he would just become invisible and travel.

S39 stop écouter
Tuar qōn̄ nēr s-van kēl sag nēr s-mōl kēl ma ron̄ “Wrisris m-mōl kēl nok ma!”

And then another day, people would walk back up there, and returning to the village they’d say “Wrisris is back!”

S40 stop écouterAF:
*Nē m-van ma ave? Nē ta Lkon? (i Wrisris)*

[AF] Where was Wrisris from? Was he a native of Gaua?

S41 stop écouterCM:
Wrisris ni ta Lkon, ni m-wot a Lkon: a Mke-Grāt, a tāvtēn t-aē.

[CM] Wrisris was from Gaua, he was born on Gaua: on the Ghraat volcano, just underneath it.

S42 stop écouter
Le qōtgi grāt, o grāt a mken, aa? a tāvtēn t-aē. Namon o tne vre a tāvtēn t-aē.

You see the volcano rising high above, right? well, he was born underneath, at the foot of the hill. His place is at the foot of the volcano.

S43 stop écouter
Ni s-togtog, nintēg tuar o wasn̄in a Diwtag.

More precisely, he lived in a place called Diwtagh.

S44 stop écouterAF:
*Diwtag?*

[AF] Diwtagh?

S45 stop écouterCM:
Diwtag. Na ssa tuar o wasn̄in. O tne vre aē. Diwtag.

[CM] Diwtagh. It’s the name of a place. It used to be a village. Diwtagh.

S46 stop écouterAF:
*Va-wē wor. Va-wē adad!*

Great. Thank you!