Wenawon le farceur (2)


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Kekkeom.
Tuar qōn̄ nen, Wenagon mēlē vaten iasan vaten ra nutnutun.
Nir me sasa vavvan nen, nir tov van be dēdē n̄a.
Nēr me an sa, Wenagon tov dē.
Wenagon me dē sa, ni ti vus ti u n̄a vavan, ma ni me tēr mēstēm tuar kariv n̄a ni tov so.
Ni me so ror nen ma, ni tov mat.
Ni me mat, nir tov le ni, sesen̄ ni a vere, gil mataqen nir tov tuvun ni.
Tuvun ni, a le qōn̄, ma ni tov tavraket a le mataqen nen,
ni tov van abe vuvur nam-nēr, vus mamētē tuar wutve, tov sivtē ni ale mataqen nen sa nir me tuvun ni allon, wa –
Sivtē ror wutve en allon, ni tov to den abe na-veran nen, ni tov to ti ale tuar vere. Ni tov sasa aben.
Sa ti abe vere nen wa nir mēlē abe u tuar vere en, nir ve mōrōs te da tuar telvun̄.
Ma nir tov da telvun̄ en, ni tov / tawa namun mēlē tov van ma.
Wa tawa namun en, ni te sa ti, ni te kere gor ti u wutve nen a le u mataqen; ni ve dōm si Wenagon nen wa – wa Wenagon ve to vata.
Ni te kere gor ti u wutve en va–van, wutve en me dar, ni ve dōm si Wenagon wa, ni tov le qut wutve en, sun̄un ale get. Tov vatoko gor wev.
Vatoko gor wev tan̄ nen wa nir tov sasa vavan, din̄ ave u wasin̄in nen tabe nir ve-da telvun̄ aben nen, nir tov lak.
Nir te lak ti a le qōn̄. Nir te lak ti a le qōn̄ ma tov nir te lak ti u mavto.
Ma nir te lak ti, tawa namun en tov lak ma. Lak ran ma tan̄ nen, ma Wenagon mēlē tov lak ma.
Lak ma tan̄ nen, taem ruru ve rivrivtē ruru, Wenagon wa: “Qut wuruk ve sun̄un ale get!”
Ma nir tov lak mēlē.
Lak mēlē va–van ma ni tov vit mēlē min tawa namun wa “Qut wuruk ve sun̄un ale get!”
Tawa namun nen te ron̄ote gor ti.
Ni te ron̄ote gor ti, ale namun dōdōmi, ni wa “Sē wun te luwluw ti min na tan̄ ne? Mēstēm Wenagon wun e!”
Nir tov lak mēlē ma tan̄ ne, taem ni me vit ran mēlē si “Qut wuruk ve sun̄un ale get!”,
ma tawa namun tov waw ran ameken; ma ni tov vit min ni wa “Wenagon, nik te karan̄ke ti!”
Ma kekeom en me bas aben ne wa.
A story.
Once upon a time, Wenagon was with his wife and his children.
They were living like that, until one day they went to gather canarium almonds.
So they walked up there, and Wenagon began to climb.
He climbed up the tree, knocking down bundles of almonds as he went up. Suddenly, as he tried to grab a branch, he missed, and fell.
He fell down on the ground, and died.
When they realised he was dead, they lifted him up, carried him to the village, dug a grave and buried him.
But after they buried him that night, suddenly he rose again from his grave,
he walked to their property, killed a pig, and threw it in the grave he had been buried in.
So he left the pig down in the grave, and walked away from his place – until he reached another village where he decided to stay.
One day, the people from that village, together with those of the other village, decided to organise a big celebration.
So there was going to be a big party, where his wife was going to come.
Meanwhile, his wife in her village had seen the pig in the grave, yet she thought it was Wenagon himself. She had no idea Wenagon had in fact gone.
She kept an eye on the pig for a while, and once the body was decomposed, she took the pig’s skull – convinced it was Wenagon’s head. She put it in a basket, which she hung over her fireplace.
After she hung the basket like that, a few days went by, until that moment when people organised that celebration in the village, with dances.
There were going to be dances at night – of those merry dances we called mavto, which villagers dance all night long.
As the dance fired up, the man’s wife joined in. She joined in the dance, and so did Wenagon!
In the middle of the dance, when they stepped closer to each other, Wenagon exclaimed “It’s just a sow’s head in your basket!”
And on they danced.
They danced on and on, until he exclaimed again to his wife “It’s just a sow’s head in your basket!”
The woman suddenly strained her ears.
She heard his call, and thought “Who could be talking to me like that? It sounds like my Wenagon!?”
The dance started again and went on, until she heard once again “It’s just a sow’s head in your basket!”
This time, the woman called back in reply; and then she added “Wenagon! You really are a crazy man!”
And this is how my story ends.
S1 stop écouter
Kekkeom.

A story.

S2 stop écouter
Tuar qōn̄ nen, Wenagon mēlē vaten iasan vaten ra nutnutun.

Once upon a time, Wenagon was with his wife and his children.

S3 stop écouter
Nir me sasa vavvan nen, nir tov van be dēdē n̄a.

They were living like that, until one day they went to gather canarium almonds.

S4 stop écouter
Nēr me an sa, Wenagon tov dē.

So they walked up there, and Wenagon began to climb.

S5 stop écouter
Wenagon me dē sa, ni ti vus ti u n̄a vavan, ma ni me tēr mēstēm tuar kariv n̄a ni tov so.

He climbed up the tree, knocking down bundles of almonds as he went up. Suddenly, as he tried to grab a branch, he missed, and fell.

S6 stop écouter
Ni me so ror nen ma, ni tov mat.

He fell down on the ground, and died.

S7 stop écouter
Ni me mat, nir tov le ni, sesen̄ ni a vere, gil mataqen nir tov tuvun ni.

When they realised he was dead, they lifted him up, carried him to the village, dug a grave and buried him.

S8 stop écouter
Tuvun ni, a le qōn̄, ma ni tov tavraket a le mataqen nen,

But after they buried him that night, suddenly he rose again from his grave,

S9 stop écouter
ni tov van abe vuvur nam-nēr, vus mamētē tuar wutve, tov sivtē ni ale mataqen nen sa nir me tuvun ni allon, wa –

he walked to their property, killed a pig, and threw it in the grave he had been buried in.

S10 stop écouter
Sivtē ror wutve en allon, ni tov to den abe na-veran nen, ni tov to ti ale tuar vere. Ni tov sasa aben.

So he left the pig down in the grave, and walked away from his place – until he reached another village where he decided to stay.

S11 stop écouter
Sa ti abe vere nen wa nir mēlē abe u tuar vere en, nir ve mōrōs te da tuar telvun̄.

One day, the people from that village, together with those of the other village, decided to organise a big celebration.

S12 stop écouter
Ma nir tov da telvun̄ en, ni tov / tawa namun mēlē tov van ma.

So there was going to be a big party, where his wife was going to come.

S13 stop écouter
Wa tawa namun en, ni te sa ti, ni te kere gor ti u wutve nen a le u mataqen; ni ve dōm si Wenagon nen wa – wa Wenagon ve to vata.

Meanwhile, his wife in her village had seen the pig in the grave, yet she thought it was Wenagon himself. She had no idea Wenagon had in fact gone.

S14 stop écouter
Ni te kere gor ti u wutve en va–van, wutve en me dar, ni ve dōm si Wenagon wa, ni tov le qut wutve en, sun̄un ale get. Tov vatoko gor wev.

She kept an eye on the pig for a while, and once the body was decomposed, she took the pig’s skull – convinced it was Wenagon’s head. She put it in a basket, which she hung over her fireplace.

S15 stop écouter
Vatoko gor wev tan̄ nen wa nir tov sasa vavan, din̄ ave u wasin̄in nen tabe nir ve-da telvun̄ aben nen, nir tov lak.

After she hung the basket like that, a few days went by, until that moment when people organised that celebration in the village, with dances.

S16 stop écouter
Nir te lak ti a le qōn̄. Nir te lak ti a le qōn̄ ma tov nir te lak ti u mavto.

There were going to be dances at night – of those merry dances we called mavto, which villagers dance all night long.

S17 stop écouter
Ma nir te lak ti, tawa namun en tov lak ma. Lak ran ma tan̄ nen, ma Wenagon mēlē tov lak ma.

As the dance fired up, the man’s wife joined in. She joined in the dance, and so did Wenagon!

S18 stop écouter
Lak ma tan̄ nen, taem ruru ve rivrivtē ruru, Wenagon wa: “Qut wuruk ve sun̄un ale get!”

In the middle of the dance, when they stepped closer to each other, Wenagon exclaimed “It’s just a sow’s head in your basket!”

S19 stop écouter
Ma nir tov lak mēlē.

And on they danced.

S20 stop écouter
Lak mēlē va–van ma ni tov vit mēlē min tawa namun wa “Qut wuruk ve sun̄un ale get!”

They danced on and on, until he exclaimed again to his wife “It’s just a sow’s head in your basket!”

S21 stop écouter
Tawa namun nen te ron̄ote gor ti.

The woman suddenly strained her ears.

S22 stop écouter
Ni te ron̄ote gor ti, ale namun dōdōmi, ni wa “Sē wun te luwluw ti min na tan̄ ne? Mēstēm Wenagon wun e!”

She heard his call, and thought “Who could be talking to me like that? It sounds like my Wenagon!?”

S23 stop écouter
Nir tov lak mēlē ma tan̄ ne, taem ni me vit ran mēlē si “Qut wuruk ve sun̄un ale get!”,

The dance started again and went on, until she heard once again “It’s just a sow’s head in your basket!”

S24 stop écouter
ma tawa namun tov waw ran ameken; ma ni tov vit min ni wa “Wenagon, nik te karan̄ke ti!”

This time, the woman called back in reply; and then she added “Wenagon! You really are a crazy man!”

S25 stop écouter
Ma kekeom en me bas aben ne wa.

And this is how my story ends.