The mat from the Underworld


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en
Ne vegevage pē tapego te Pënö në r̄ak vöwye ti.
Në r̄ak ti ne mowe pe pup ekye pe ne yane Samuel, nine ve sag që.
Pupu Samuel, nine teman takyēn r̄ekn̄ok.
Pupu Samuel, tamer̄ën nine ve sag që, nine ne Temëtr̄ōn̄.
Nine në tetō wate Pënö, nine në ōyōy Pënö.
Kön̄ së, se toge vën vën, se toge R̄ëne, R̄ē Tawegone;
se toge vën vën, ne qin tamesō n̄ot mët.
Ne qin tamesō in mët – ten̄war̄e ve toge ve wane yö gemoy, ve wane r̄ōg ne mesë.
Tuwuyegë ve toge ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ yön̄we pe ne qin tamesō vē ēn e yōne.
Se r̄ar̄ōn̄ vën vën, pa pupu kye, pe Samuel, nine r̄ōn̄ ne qin yeqën tamesō pe ne qin ten̄wën ena ve yër̄e ti –
nine r̄ōn̄ ne vogmamer̄ö i ne r̄ar̄ōn̄ pe nine ve r̄er̄ar̄ōn̄ eye.
Ne ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ ne gat tom – tom nine mar̄i ne tamesō na; ne tamesō na në tëpyë pe tëpyë!
Ne voygë ppa ne tamesō na ve r̄ak se në tēnnēr̄: ve yëtour̄ie…
Nine tër̄ö n̄ot tom ne tamesō in yër̄e.
Alë, tamer̄ën nine ve r̄er̄ar̄ōn̄ n̄wë ne, nine r̄ar̄ōn̄ ne getgatēt ne yan pupu kye Samuel, gat tom:
“Pupu Samuel! Ike ne tayö tr̄an̄e! Tomn̄wëtom on ike vöwye ike në yöy Pënö, noke n̄is tom ike mar̄i nök tamesō on at n̄wuye wuyog!”
Pa ne qin tamesō in nine / ne yon̄ ena ppa r̄ossë piti. Sise ve r̄ak / se ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ pe ie.
Alë ~ sise toge mi ne wane pa se r̄ōn̄ ne r̄ar̄ōn̄ ve tu yön̄we, tuwuyegë ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ se r̄ōn̄ ne yn̄an ne qin tamesō in, ve gatēt tom –
nine ne yōne n̄is tom, tomn̄wë Pupu Samuel on tir̄ tayö Temëtr̄ōn̄ wye në yöy Pënö, tom nin’ on tayö tr̄an̄e vöwye, ne yōne n̄is tom n’ on yaie n̄wuye n’ atan ne qin ten̄wën ena me ton ne Pënö.
Alë, r̄ak tom nine r̄ōn̄ n̄wë nëne, ne gatēt ti tekn̄wa yö gemoy, tom: “Tuwesate, vogmamer̄ö, noke kayr̄ake që!”
Alë nine kayr̄ake nine tō.
Nine tō, ne tō i ne / ne tō mer̄ame ye, ne tō i n’ opëne.
Tō wat’ uw, Pënö, tekn̄wa ve toge ve yekeyake pē nösa tayö r̄aqe, take mët ti.
Nine vē ēn e yön̄we, yön̄w’ in ne voygë in ppa në mate: ne tiat në mate, ne qōne, ne wōga, ne papen̄ite, ne voygë ppa në mate.
Ne qin / n’ atan ne qin tamesō in v’ iy ēn e yön̄we.
Pa nëpe n̄wën / ne temët pe ve ywö r̄ōse nine në r̄ekr̄ok, nine mi ne r̄ër̄ë pe në tir̄tir̄.
R̄ak tom tër̄ën̄ta tom Pupu Samuel ne ya i / oye n̄wot n’ atan ne qin tamesō pene ton ne Pënö.
Tamer̄ën s’ on yekeyake n̄wë ne, s’ on yake me n̄wute se ve tar̄ake ti ie, s’ on vën n̄wuye wuyog, nine tō nine oye ne tewot r̄ër̄ë nine mok er̄ē qitine.
Tamer̄ën sise ve yake me n̄wë ne, nine yēq’ i ten̄wën temët en̄ot me.
Nine yēq’ ie me, ne gat tom / ne vegevage mi nine tom: “Tör̄ö / Noke ta ququy mike?”
Tom “E, në mer̄awe! Ti n’ ave?”
“Ne yök n̄is tom nok’ oye ne tayö kye pe vē ēn e yön̄we pe kemi ve sewesawe pē kön̄ ena, meyekeyake ti / meyekeyake pēne.
Pa – tër̄ën̄ta tog inoke n̄ot, nëpe ne qin pe ve ywö r̄ōg kemi, nine ne tayö tr̄an̄e. Në tër̄ën̄ta n̄ot tom noke tō wr̄og.”
Alë, ne qin temët pene nine gatēt se tom: “E, në mer̄awe!”
“Ne tayö pe ywö rōg kema nine në tr̄an̄e pe tr̄an̄e.
Në mer̄awe tom noke gatēt nome r̄ër̄ë tike. Ike tō n̄wuye, ike r̄ak.”
Alë, ne qin temët in gatēt ne r̄ër̄ë se, ne tō n̄wuye.
Tō n̄wuye, tō wate me yö mer̄ame ta pene; ne yar̄ ne r̄ër̄ë nine pön̄ inine ie.
Nine sor̄ ne tewot qegay’ i ne qitine, ne tō n̄wuye wuyog.
Tamer̄ën tō n̄wuye wuyog vën, nine yō: ter̄on̄ye togie pe.
Nine vēn vēn er̄ē ēn̄we, nine sevaye n̄wot / nine kēw yēt ne wōyuqe pe ne tiat ve quy ie.
Kēw yēt tuwë, nine yë uw ne yō qin tamesō pe nëne n’ atane ve sag eyö tapego.
Tamer̄ën nine ve yēq’ i (ne) ten̄wën, nine wer̄war̄, ten̄wën yë r̄ake vēn, timer̄ën nine ve yēqe ie nine wötog ne myane se, nine / ne qin tamesō pe nëne n’ atane kayr̄ake.
N’ on kayr̄ake n̄wë ne, kayr̄ake ver̄og mi ne tapego.
Gave vēn me, vën r̄ōw wr̄og i ne tiat, Pupu Samuel sag me / sag vēn mie yö tiat in, sör̄ö tu yö mat in / yö tapego, sör̄ö gave me yö mer̄ame.
Tamer̄ën gave wate me yön̄we, nine netnot ne qiti ēn̄we, tekn̄wa woter̄ite ie.
Se woter̄ite ie se r̄ōn̄ te Pupu Samuel ne ve netnot ne qiti ēn̄we; se woter̄ite ver̄og i ten̄wën tamesō ne yon̄ ena n̄wuye wuyog me.
Alë ne mat in, ne tapego in, tekn̄wa / tuwuyegë pusune yöymer̄ën vevë ie.
Pa tati tom paëne: tuwuyegë tr̄ö tati yöymer̄ën wur̄og që ne vevë, nëpe nine ne mat mitiw, ne mat pe në oye ti ton ne Pënö.
Wye tog i tekn̄wa ti ie, Pupu Samuel ve vegevage vati tekn̄wa ti ie: r̄ak tom tekn̄wa pe ve tegetoge mi nine sise veteno n̄wë n’ ave on vë ne mat.
Tuqn̄waëne, ne mat in / ne tapego in nine ain ton ne tapego / tapego pe tekn̄wa tom ‘tapego te Sag’, ‘tapego te Pan̄kis’.
Ne tapego in, ne sr̄ine në ēn vir̄ö taviyi, alë wyë n̄wute në wetewate.
Tan̄wöy pene. Yöywye tike.
Here is the story of the mat from the Underworld – a true story.
It happened at a time when one of my ancestors, called Samuel, was alive.
Grandpa Samuel was one of my mother’s uncles.
During his life, Grandpa Samuel was a shaman.
He would travel to the Underworld, sometimes walking, sometimes floating.
The story takes place in the village of Grētaweghone, in the mountain.
People were living there, until one day, an old man passed away.
And as this old man had passed away, the men of the village were all sitting in the club house, drinking kava to mourn his death.
Meanwhile, the women were all gathered in the house of the dead man, to hold a vigil over his body.
So they were lamenting on and on, and at some point, my grandfather Samuel heard the voice of the old woman who had just lost her husband.
And as he heard her wail, he became overwhelmed with sorrow.
She was wailing, lamenting how much she was missing her husband; and how much he had always loved her.
Her husband had always be so kind to her, always so caring…
She was terribly upset to have lost him.
And in the midst of her lament, she would invoke the name of my grandfather Samuel:
“Old Samuel! You’re a man of power! If it is true that you can visit the Underworld, I urge you to take pity on my husband, please bring him back to life!”
But her husband had already breathed his last breath! Everyone was already mourning him.
At this moment, the men who were busy drinking kava heard the wails coming out of that house; and among the women’s laments, they heard the voice of that old woman –
she was asking Old Samuel to prove he was really a shaman who could travel to the Underworld, that he was truly a man of power; and she was begging him to try and recover the soul of her husband from the realm of the Dead.
And as he heard this, he told his companions in the club house: “Sorry, my friends, but I have to go.”
So he rose and walked out.
And he just kept going. He walked simply like this, with his wordly body.
When he reached down in the Underworld, everyone there was dancing to celebrate the newcomer who had just died.
The man was still lying in his house – except that this house was all brand new: the thatch roof, the rafters, the purlins, the bamboo wallings… everything was made of raw, green wood.
And so, the old man – or rather, his soul – was still there, lying inside the house.
The leader of the Dead was particularly mighty, as he mastered magic plants of great power.
This made it quite dangerous for Old Samuel to rescue that man’s soul from the Underworld.
The dance went on and on like this. At some point, the line of dancers veered back to the spot where they had started; and as they were dancing along, our man jumped in, a flower stuck in his hair.
As they kept dancing like this, he beckoned one of the ghosts.
So he beckoned him, and told him: “Can I be friends with you?”
“Yes of course,” the other replied, “How can I help you?”
“Well, I would like to retrieve my relative who’s lying in the house, that very same person whose arrival you’re all dancing to celebrate.
But then – it’s going to be quite difficult for me, because your leader is so powerful. It’s just impossible for me to succeed.”
“That’s perfectly fine,” replied the ghost.
“Our leader is indeed extremely powerful.
But that’s alright, I’ll show you what plants you need, so you can go back and prepare them.”
The ghost explained the plants to him, and he went back.
So he walked back to our World, here. He immediately looked for the plants he needed [to become invisible to ghosts], and rubbed them on to himself.
Then he stuck a hibiscus flower on his head, and set off again.
When he reached back the Underworld again, he realised how much easier it had now become for him.
He climbed on the house, and with his thumbs snapped one of the sago canes in the thatch structure.
He snapped one of those canes, and watched down. He saw the old man there, whose soul was lying on a mat.
As he beckoned him and called his name, the old man looked up. And as he held out his arm to invite him, he saw the old man’s soul rise in the air.
But just as he rose like this, his mat was rising with him!
The soul flew up like this, floated through the thatch leaves, and came to sit on the roof with Old Samuel. Then the two of them stepped on the mat, and set off to fly back to our World.
They flew all the way, till they reached above their home. Old Samuel knocked on the ridgepole, and everyone there startled.
At first, they were startled as they heard Samuel knock the roof. But their biggest shock was when they saw the old man, and realised his breath had come back to him!
Today, that type of mat is one which most people, especially most women, know how to weave.
Well, not everyone knows: some women actually do not know well how to make it – this is because we’re talking of a secret type of mat, one which was brought right from the Underworld.
Luckily for us, Old Samuel was able to explain everything: this is how the people around him were able to learn how this map should be woven.
Nowadays, this mat is still in use, and it looks different from the more common type that’s called “the Banks Islands mat”.
The mat I’m talking about is one where the thick stems lie on both sides, while the part in the middle is flat.
This is all. Thank you.
S1 stop écouter
Ne vegevage pē tapego te Pënö në r̄ak vöwye ti.

Here is the story of the mat from the Underworld – a true story.

S2 stop écouter
Në r̄ak ti ne mowe pe pup ekye pe ne yane Samuel, nine ve sag që.

It happened at a time when one of my ancestors, called Samuel, was alive.

S3 stop écouter
Pupu Samuel, nine teman takyēn r̄ekn̄ok.

Grandpa Samuel was one of my mother’s uncles.

S4 stop écouter
Pupu Samuel, tamer̄ën nine ve sag që, nine ne Temëtr̄ōn̄.

During his life, Grandpa Samuel was a shaman.

S5 stop écouter
Nine në tetō wate Pënö, nine në ōyōy Pënö.

He would travel to the Underworld, sometimes walking, sometimes floating.

S6 stop écouter
Kön̄ së, se toge vën vën, se toge R̄ëne, R̄ē Tawegone;

The story takes place in the village of Grētaweghone, in the mountain.

S7 stop écouter
se toge vën vën, ne qin tamesō n̄ot mët.

People were living there, until one day, an old man passed away.

S8 stop écouter
Ne qin tamesō in mët – ten̄war̄e ve toge ve wane yö gemoy, ve wane r̄ōg ne mesë.

And as this old man had passed away, the men of the village were all sitting in the club house, drinking kava to mourn his death.

S9 stop écouter
Tuwuyegë ve toge ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ yön̄we pe ne qin tamesō vē ēn e yōne.

Meanwhile, the women were all gathered in the house of the dead man, to hold a vigil over his body.

S10 stop écouter
Se r̄ar̄ōn̄ vën vën, pa pupu kye, pe Samuel, nine r̄ōn̄ ne qin yeqën tamesō pe ne qin ten̄wën ena ve yër̄e ti –

So they were lamenting on and on, and at some point, my grandfather Samuel heard the voice of the old woman who had just lost her husband.

S11 stop écouter
nine r̄ōn̄ ne vogmamer̄ö i ne r̄ar̄ōn̄ pe nine ve r̄er̄ar̄ōn̄ eye.

And as he heard her wail, he became overwhelmed with sorrow.

S12 stop écouter
Ne ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ ne gat tom – tom nine mar̄i ne tamesō na; ne tamesō na në tëpyë pe tëpyë!

She was wailing, lamenting how much she was missing her husband; and how much he had always loved her.

S13 stop écouter
Ne voygë ppa ne tamesō na ve r̄ak se në tēnnēr̄: ve yëtour̄ie…

Her husband had always be so kind to her, always so caring…

S14 stop écouter
Nine tër̄ö n̄ot tom ne tamesō in yër̄e.

She was terribly upset to have lost him.

S15 stop écouter
Alë, tamer̄ën nine ve r̄er̄ar̄ōn̄ n̄wë ne, nine r̄ar̄ōn̄ ne getgatēt ne yan pupu kye Samuel, gat tom:

And in the midst of her lament, she would invoke the name of my grandfather Samuel:

S16 stop écouter
“Pupu Samuel! Ike ne tayö tr̄an̄e! Tomn̄wëtom on ike vöwye ike në yöy Pënö, noke n̄is tom ike mar̄i nök tamesō on at n̄wuye wuyog!”

“Old Samuel! You’re a man of power! If it is true that you can visit the Underworld, I urge you to take pity on my husband, please bring him back to life!”

S17 stop écouter
Pa ne qin tamesō in nine / ne yon̄ ena ppa r̄ossë piti. Sise ve r̄ak / se ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ pe ie.

But her husband had already breathed his last breath! Everyone was already mourning him.

S18 stop écouter
Alë ~ sise toge mi ne wane pa se r̄ōn̄ ne r̄ar̄ōn̄ ve tu yön̄we, tuwuyegë ve r̄ar̄ōn̄ se r̄ōn̄ ne yn̄an ne qin tamesō in, ve gatēt tom –

At this moment, the men who were busy drinking kava heard the wails coming out of that house; and among the women’s laments, they heard the voice of that old woman –

S19 stop écouter
nine ne yōne n̄is tom, tomn̄wë Pupu Samuel on tir̄ tayö Temëtr̄ōn̄ wye në yöy Pënö, tom nin’ on tayö tr̄an̄e vöwye, ne yōne n̄is tom n’ on yaie n̄wuye n’ atan ne qin ten̄wën ena me ton ne Pënö.

she was asking Old Samuel to prove he was really a shaman who could travel to the Underworld, that he was truly a man of power; and she was begging him to try and recover the soul of her husband from the realm of the Dead.

S20 stop écouter
Alë, r̄ak tom nine r̄ōn̄ n̄wë nëne, ne gatēt ti tekn̄wa yö gemoy, tom: “Tuwesate, vogmamer̄ö, noke kayr̄ake që!”

And as he heard this, he told his companions in the club house: “Sorry, my friends, but I have to go.”

S21 stop écouter
Alë nine kayr̄ake nine tō.

So he rose and walked out.

S22 stop écouter
Nine tō, ne tō i ne / ne tō mer̄ame ye, ne tō i n’ opëne.

And he just kept going. He walked simply like this, with his wordly body.

S23 stop écouter
Tō wat’ uw, Pënö, tekn̄wa ve toge ve yekeyake pē nösa tayö r̄aqe, take mët ti.

When he reached down in the Underworld, everyone there was dancing to celebrate the newcomer who had just died.

S24 stop écouter
Nine vē ēn e yön̄we, yön̄w’ in ne voygë in ppa në mate: ne tiat në mate, ne qōne, ne wōga, ne papen̄ite, ne voygë ppa në mate.

The man was still lying in his house – except that this house was all brand new: the thatch roof, the rafters, the purlins, the bamboo wallings… everything was made of raw, green wood.

S25 stop écouter
Ne qin / n’ atan ne qin tamesō in v’ iy ēn e yön̄we.

And so, the old man – or rather, his soul – was still there, lying inside the house.

S26 stop écouter
Pa nëpe n̄wën / ne temët pe ve ywö r̄ōse nine në r̄ekr̄ok, nine mi ne r̄ër̄ë pe në tir̄tir̄.

The leader of the Dead was particularly mighty, as he mastered magic plants of great power.

S27 stop écouter
R̄ak tom tër̄ën̄ta tom Pupu Samuel ne ya i / oye n̄wot n’ atan ne qin tamesō pene ton ne Pënö.

This made it quite dangerous for Old Samuel to rescue that man’s soul from the Underworld.

S28 stop écouter
Tamer̄ën s’ on yekeyake n̄wë ne, s’ on yake me n̄wute se ve tar̄ake ti ie, s’ on vën n̄wuye wuyog, nine tō nine oye ne tewot r̄ër̄ë nine mok er̄ē qitine.

The dance went on and on like this. At some point, the line of dancers veered back to the spot where they had started; and as they were dancing along, our man jumped in, a flower stuck in his hair.

S29 stop écouter
Tamer̄ën sise ve yake me n̄wë ne, nine yēq’ i ten̄wën temët en̄ot me.

As they kept dancing like this, he beckoned one of the ghosts.

S30 stop écouter
Nine yēq’ ie me, ne gat tom / ne vegevage mi nine tom: “Tör̄ö / Noke ta ququy mike?”

So he beckoned him, and told him: “Can I be friends with you?”

S31 stop écouter
Tom “E, në mer̄awe! Ti n’ ave?”

“Yes of course,” the other replied, “How can I help you?”

S32 stop écouter
“Ne yök n̄is tom nok’ oye ne tayö kye pe vē ēn e yön̄we pe kemi ve sewesawe pē kön̄ ena, meyekeyake ti / meyekeyake pēne.

“Well, I would like to retrieve my relative who’s lying in the house, that very same person whose arrival you’re all dancing to celebrate.

S33 stop écouter
Pa – tër̄ën̄ta tog inoke n̄ot, nëpe ne qin pe ve ywö r̄ōg kemi, nine ne tayö tr̄an̄e. Në tër̄ën̄ta n̄ot tom noke tō wr̄og.”

But then – it’s going to be quite difficult for me, because your leader is so powerful. It’s just impossible for me to succeed.”

S34 stop écouter
Alë, ne qin temët pene nine gatēt se tom: “E, në mer̄awe!”

“That’s perfectly fine,” replied the ghost.

S35 stop écouter
“Ne tayö pe ywö rōg kema nine në tr̄an̄e pe tr̄an̄e.

“Our leader is indeed extremely powerful.

S36 stop écouter
Në mer̄awe tom noke gatēt nome r̄ër̄ë tike. Ike tō n̄wuye, ike r̄ak.”

But that’s alright, I’ll show you what plants you need, so you can go back and prepare them.”

S37 stop écouter
Alë, ne qin temët in gatēt ne r̄ër̄ë se, ne tō n̄wuye.

The ghost explained the plants to him, and he went back.

S38 stop écouter
Tō n̄wuye, tō wate me yö mer̄ame ta pene; ne yar̄ ne r̄ër̄ë nine pön̄ inine ie.

So he walked back to our World, here. He immediately looked for the plants he needed [to become invisible to ghosts], and rubbed them on to himself.

S39 stop écouter
Nine sor̄ ne tewot qegay’ i ne qitine, ne tō n̄wuye wuyog.

Then he stuck a hibiscus flower on his head, and set off again.

S40 stop écouter
Tamer̄ën tō n̄wuye wuyog vën, nine yō: ter̄on̄ye togie pe.

When he reached back the Underworld again, he realised how much easier it had now become for him.

S41 stop écouter
Nine vēn vēn er̄ē ēn̄we, nine sevaye n̄wot / nine kēw yēt ne wōyuqe pe ne tiat ve quy ie.

He climbed on the house, and with his thumbs snapped one of the sago canes in the thatch structure.

S42 stop écouter
Kēw yēt tuwë, nine yë uw ne yō qin tamesō pe nëne n’ atane ve sag eyö tapego.

He snapped one of those canes, and watched down. He saw the old man there, whose soul was lying on a mat.

S43 stop écouter
Tamer̄ën nine ve yēq’ i (ne) ten̄wën, nine wer̄war̄, ten̄wën yë r̄ake vēn, timer̄ën nine ve yēqe ie nine wötog ne myane se, nine / ne qin tamesō pe nëne n’ atane kayr̄ake.

As he beckoned him and called his name, the old man looked up. And as he held out his arm to invite him, he saw the old man’s soul rise in the air.

S44 stop écouter
N’ on kayr̄ake n̄wë ne, kayr̄ake ver̄og mi ne tapego.

But just as he rose like this, his mat was rising with him!

S45 stop écouter
Gave vēn me, vën r̄ōw wr̄og i ne tiat, Pupu Samuel sag me / sag vēn mie yö tiat in, sör̄ö tu yö mat in / yö tapego, sör̄ö gave me yö mer̄ame.

The soul flew up like this, floated through the thatch leaves, and came to sit on the roof with Old Samuel. Then the two of them stepped on the mat, and set off to fly back to our World.

S46 stop écouter
Tamer̄ën gave wate me yön̄we, nine netnot ne qiti ēn̄we, tekn̄wa woter̄ite ie.

They flew all the way, till they reached above their home. Old Samuel knocked on the ridgepole, and everyone there startled.

S47 stop écouter
Se woter̄ite ie se r̄ōn̄ te Pupu Samuel ne ve netnot ne qiti ēn̄we; se woter̄ite ver̄og i ten̄wën tamesō ne yon̄ ena n̄wuye wuyog me.

At first, they were startled as they heard Samuel knock the roof. But their biggest shock was when they saw the old man, and realised his breath had come back to him!

S48 stop écouter
Alë ne mat in, ne tapego in, tekn̄wa / tuwuyegë pusune yöymer̄ën vevë ie.

Today, that type of mat is one which most people, especially most women, know how to weave.

S49 stop écouter
Pa tati tom paëne: tuwuyegë tr̄ö tati yöymer̄ën wur̄og që ne vevë, nëpe nine ne mat mitiw, ne mat pe në oye ti ton ne Pënö.

Well, not everyone knows: some women actually do not know well how to make it – this is because we’re talking of a secret type of mat, one which was brought right from the Underworld.

S50 stop écouter
Wye tog i tekn̄wa ti ie, Pupu Samuel ve vegevage vati tekn̄wa ti ie: r̄ak tom tekn̄wa pe ve tegetoge mi nine sise veteno n̄wë n’ ave on vë ne mat.

Luckily for us, Old Samuel was able to explain everything: this is how the people around him were able to learn how this map should be woven.

S51 stop écouter
Tuqn̄waëne, ne mat in / ne tapego in nine ain ton ne tapego / tapego pe tekn̄wa tom ‘tapego te Sag’, ‘tapego te Pan̄kis’.

Nowadays, this mat is still in use, and it looks different from the more common type that’s called “the Banks Islands mat”.

S52 stop écouter
Ne tapego in, ne sr̄ine në ēn vir̄ö taviyi, alë wyë n̄wute në wetewate.

The mat I’m talking about is one where the thick stems lie on both sides, while the part in the middle is flat.

S53 stop écouter
Tan̄wöy pene. Yöywye tike.

This is all. Thank you.