L'origine du volcan de Gaua


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Na sususrig / Na susrig sur o m̄erm̄er s-rō valrēg tbirār.
Tuar qōn̄ nen̄, nēr t-togtog ti, i tbirār m-van a ōt.
M-van a ōt, alē rār m-la nāvsirār, rār m-siw le naw, rār t-venven o ninti law ti.
Rār m-venven o ninti law nen̄ a–van, rār m-mōl ma i vre, i tbirār m-mōl ma a ōt, rār m-la ma namirār o law nen̄, tōlnēr so gān.
La tōlnēr t-gān qarqar wor ti.
Me-mmat ror, tbirār so van mlē a ōt.
Ni ron̄ “Ra tbuk, kmur m-togtog, kmur kak m-vanvan le naw wa, kmur vte vanvan te kēl vak gin tuar o wren̄ra; kmur vte vanvan tvilag te vak.
Tekgor kmur s-van aē, kmur s-van wōn i tbikmur.”
Rār m-van mlē le naw me-tur nāvsirār, rār m-van ror, rār so venven o ninti o law.
Rār m-venven nen̄ a–van, rār so van vga vak gin tuar o wren̄ra.
Bas, rār so mōl ma i vre, tbirār m-mōl nok ma a ōt, tbirār so vārus rār; ron̄ “Kmur m-dēn̄ ave?”
Ron̄ “Kmār m-dēn̄ gin o wren̄ra, kmār so van vak, kmār so van vasul mlē vak gin tuar o wren̄ra.”
Tbirār ron̄ “Kmur gēn m-bas wor t’aē nen̄! Tekgor kmur s-van galāg mlē vak, kmur s-van wōn i tbikmur.”
Me-mmat ror le rorwor, rār m-van mlē le naw, tbirār so van mlē a ōt.
Rār m-van ror nen̄ le naw, rār m-venven o law, a–van, rār ron̄ “Dār van sē vak sa? Tbidār t-wes gor dār dēn vanvan vak sa ti sur sa?”
Rār m-van vak, rār t-ven o law ti, rār m-ron̄ wor sē: o magte so siol dēn ma lēlē lē.
Ron̄ “Kmur t-ven o sav ti?” Ron̄ “O law. Ngatōlkma ra tbikmār.”
O magte nen̄ ron̄ “Ngatōlgēn!”
M-van ma sur rār nen̄, m-la dēn rār o law, ron̄ “Kmur t-gān aksav ti?”
Ron̄ “Kmār t-gān qarqar wor ti.”
Magte ron̄ “Ar la ma!” Ni m-la ma, ni so tul leln̄a bnēn.
Ni m-tul leln̄a bnēn, ni so tul kēl nālman gor.
Tōlnēr t-taktak ti; taktak galāg wor, ni m-la kēl dēn o m̄onm̄on leln̄a bnēn, ni m-la ma; ni m-la min rār, titi o law nen̄ va-mnog nok.
Rār m-gān, rār me-tur ma, tōlnēr ra tbirār m-gān, tbirār ron̄: “Ra tbuk, sa gēn vawē le. Kmur m-la o āv sa ave? O va sa me-mnog!”
Rār ron̄ “Vak sa gin magte.”
Rār / “Ar row kēl, kmur s-la namitōlgēn o āv dēn i magte.”
Rār m-sur-la kēl vak nen̄, rār m-row sē vak, i magte ni m-to kal nok.
Ni m-to srēg tuar masle bē; kma t-var o masle bē nen̄ ti kak ‘Krēwelav’.
Rār me-tur o vni mtō, rār me-vrisa sag nen̄, rār sur-bē tētēg ni ti; magte so kal le m̄ōs.
Rār me-tkar ni sur o āv.
I magte m-sasiw le masle bē, rār so sasiw le masle bē, magte so kal le m̄ōs.
Tōlnēr me-vrisa sag, vrisa sur bē sag a–van, m-dēn̄ o wasn̄in kma t-var ti kak a Nāvnimtō.
Rār me-vrisa vasul ni, rār so qāg tus o vni mtō gor na ngon.
Magte m-row ma wa magte m-row gās rār, titi o āv so gar gin o vni mtō.
O wasn̄in nen̄, kma t-var ti ron̄ a Nāvnimtō. Namirār o vni mtō t-tog gēs mlē ti, m-ris vāt.
La rār m-la o āv nen̄, rār so mōl kēl ma sur i tbirār.
Tōlnēr so vōnagav vgar namitōlnēr o āv, tōlnēr t-daw ngatōlnēr o gāngēn ni ti.
La i magte nen̄ ni m-tur a Nāvnimtō, ni so salvut. Ni m-salvut, ni so row tog mke tuar tōw, kma t-var ti ron̄ “a Mke Grāt”.
Ni m-row tog atwal ror, o āv so gān o / o āv m-gān o wavlis, m-gān o dada rga, āv so gān [o rga]…
Dēkēn, o magte nen̄ ni t-tog t’ a Mke Grāt, a mke tōw, o āv t-gān ti, m-gān sursur nok, ni t-tog mlē ti m-dēn̄ naqri.
Dōn qōn̄, nēk va-mrōs tektek, nēk s-gav ma mke plēn – oke, nēk s-tek swēl ror: o āv t-qoq ti a mke tōw, kma t-var ti ron̄ a Mke Grāt.
Ni me-tger wor nok le tan, titi dēkēn ni t-tog mlēti. O tōw nen̄, kma t-var ti ron̄ a Mke Grāt.
La magte t-tog t’ a Mke Grāt nen̄, ka ni o āv.
Ni m-van dēn a le naw, tāre lōmlōmgāv nen̄ rār me-tkar ni, ni m-to dēn rār.
Ni gēn so row tog t’ a mke tōw nen̄, a Mke Grāt nen̄, ni t-tog mlēti dēn̄ naqri.
Dēkēn, nēr m-lēs tuar sas nen̄ nēr t-var ti ron̄ / leln̄a Waetman, t-var ti ron̄ ‘volkenu’. La le na-ln̄akma, le lanwis, kma t-var ti ron̄ “Mke Grāt”.
Sususrig sa ni gēn t-bas gēn t’ aē sa le.
This is the story of two boys and their grandfather.
One day, as they were home, their grandfather went to work in his taro garden.
While he was in the garden, the two boys took their bows and arrows, walked down to the lagoon, and began fishing for small blennies.
Once they had caught enough blennies, they returned to their hamlet. When their grandfather came back home, they showed him their catch, and everyone had dinner together.
They were just eating their food raw.
The next morning, their grandfather went to the taro garden again.
But before he left, he told them: “Listen, children. If ever, later today, you walk down to the sea, then make sure you don’t go in that direction over there, to one of those headlands. Make sure you don’t go beyond that point!
If you ever go there, you might run into one of your ancestors.”
So off they went again to the coast, with their bows and arrows in hand, until they reached the sea and began to fish for blennies again.
They went on and on fishing, until they crossed a point.
And then they returned back home. Their grandfather, who had already come back from the garden, enquired “How far did you go?”
“Well, after we reached the headland, we pushed a little further, until we reached a second headland.”
“Alright – he replied – that’s enough! Take care not to go any further that way, otherwise you’ll run into one of your ancestors!”
As they woke up the next morning, the two boys went down to the sea again, while their grandfather went away to the garden.
They walked down to the lagoon and began fishing for blennies. At some point, they said to each other “Can’t we go further up? After all, why does Grandpa forbid us to go this way?”
So they crossed that point and continued to fish. Then suddenly they heard some rustling: it was an old woman dragging herself out of her cave.
“What are you fishing for?”, she asked. “Blennies”, they replied. “For the two of us, and for our Grandpa.”
“Let’s eat them together!” said the old woman.
She came closer to them, took the fish from them, and asked “How do you eat them?
– We just eat them raw.
– Let me take them!”, exclaimed the old woman, as she suddenly stuck the fish under her armpit.
She stuck it under her armpit, and held it with her other hand.
They all sat there for a little while, going on with their conversation, and finally she took the food parcel from under her arms, and brought it forward. She gave it to the two boys, who saw the fish was now cooked!
They had a bit of it, and went back home with the rest, so they could share it with their grandfather. As soon as the latter tasted it, he exclaimed: “Hey boys, this is delicious! Where did you find that fire? This food has obviously been cooked!”
“We received it from an old woman, over there.” they replied.
“Then you should dash back there, and try to steal that woman’s fire for us.”
Right away they rushed back along the shore – but the old woman had already fled.
She was running upriver along a creek, one we call ‘Krēwelav’.
The two boys grabbed a coconut husk and ran after her, following the creek uphill. But the old woman was already entering the forest.
They were chasing her to catch her fire.
As she waded across the creek, they followed her – but she had already entered the deep forest.
They ran on and on up along the river, until they reached the place we call Navnimto (‘Coconut Husk’).
As soon as the two boys had overtaken her, they flung their coconut husk at her face.
The woman managed to jump out and escape them, but the fire had already caught in the husk.
Remember we call this place ‘Coconut Husk’. And indeed, the two boys’ coconut husk still exists today, after it turned into a rock.
The boys seized the fire, and brought it back to their grandfather.
The little family was now able to light a fire, which became theirs forever. From that day on, they would always use this fire to cook their food.
As for the old woman who was still up at Navnimto, she suddenly took a big leap, and threw herself up to the top of a mountain – the one we call “a-Mke-Ghrāt”.
As soon as she landed, all the vegetation there took fire – grass, leaves, trees, everything was in flames.
Up to this day, that old witch still lives on top of Mount Garet. She has consumed that mountain all the way down to its depths, and is still burning today.
One day, if you want to see by yourself, just board a plane, and then look down: you’ll see a cloud of smoke on top of a mountain – that’s our volcano, Mount Garet.
She may have sunk into the ground, but she’s still there, inside the volcano.
That old woman inside the volcano is no other than Fire.
She used to live by the sea, but one day she was chased by two boys and had to run away from them.
Eventually she threw herself on to the top of that mountain, Mount Garet, and she still lives there to this day.
Nowadays, some people have adopted a word from the language of Europeans: ‘volkenu’. But in our language, in Dorig, the true name of that mountain is “Mke-Ghraat”, Mount Garet.
And this is how this story ends.
S1 stop écouter
Na sususrig / Na susrig sur o m̄erm̄er s-rō valrēg tbirār.

This is the story of two boys and their grandfather.

S2 stop écouter
Tuar qōn̄ nen̄, nēr t-togtog ti, i tbirār m-van a ōt.

One day, as they were home, their grandfather went to work in his taro garden.

S3 stop écouter
M-van a ōt, alē rār m-la nāvsirār, rār m-siw le naw, rār t-venven o ninti law ti.

While he was in the garden, the two boys took their bows and arrows, walked down to the lagoon, and began fishing for small blennies.

S4 stop écouter
Rār m-venven o ninti law nen̄ a–van, rār m-mōl ma i vre, i tbirār m-mōl ma a ōt, rār m-la ma namirār o law nen̄, tōlnēr so gān.

Once they had caught enough blennies, they returned to their hamlet. When their grandfather came back home, they showed him their catch, and everyone had dinner together.

S5 stop écouter
La tōlnēr t-gān qarqar wor ti.

They were just eating their food raw.

S6 stop écouter
Me-mmat ror, tbirār so van mlē a ōt.

The next morning, their grandfather went to the taro garden again.

S7 stop écouter
Ni ron̄ “Ra tbuk, kmur m-togtog, kmur kak m-vanvan le naw wa, kmur vte vanvan te kēl vak gin tuar o wren̄ra; kmur vte vanvan tvilag te vak.

But before he left, he told them: “Listen, children. If ever, later today, you walk down to the sea, then make sure you don’t go in that direction over there, to one of those headlands. Make sure you don’t go beyond that point!

S8 stop écouter
Tekgor kmur s-van aē, kmur s-van wōn i tbikmur.”

If you ever go there, you might run into one of your ancestors.”

S9 stop écouter
Rār m-van mlē le naw me-tur nāvsirār, rār m-van ror, rār so venven o ninti o law.

So off they went again to the coast, with their bows and arrows in hand, until they reached the sea and began to fish for blennies again.

S10 stop écouter
Rār m-venven nen̄ a–van, rār so van vga vak gin tuar o wren̄ra.

They went on and on fishing, until they crossed a point.

S11 stop écouter
Bas, rār so mōl ma i vre, tbirār m-mōl nok ma a ōt, tbirār so vārus rār; ron̄ “Kmur m-dēn̄ ave?”

And then they returned back home. Their grandfather, who had already come back from the garden, enquired “How far did you go?”

S12 stop écouter
Ron̄ “Kmār m-dēn̄ gin o wren̄ra, kmār so van vak, kmār so van vasul mlē vak gin tuar o wren̄ra.”

“Well, after we reached the headland, we pushed a little further, until we reached a second headland.”

S13 stop écouter
Tbirār ron̄ “Kmur gēn m-bas wor t’aē nen̄! Tekgor kmur s-van galāg mlē vak, kmur s-van wōn i tbikmur.”

“Alright – he replied – that’s enough! Take care not to go any further that way, otherwise you’ll run into one of your ancestors!”

S14 stop écouter
Me-mmat ror le rorwor, rār m-van mlē le naw, tbirār so van mlē a ōt.

As they woke up the next morning, the two boys went down to the sea again, while their grandfather went away to the garden.

S15 stop écouter
Rār m-van ror nen̄ le naw, rār m-venven o law, a–van, rār ron̄ “Dār van sē vak sa? Tbidār t-wes gor dār dēn vanvan vak sa ti sur sa?”

They walked down to the lagoon and began fishing for blennies. At some point, they said to each other “Can’t we go further up? After all, why does Grandpa forbid us to go this way?”

S16 stop écouter
Rār m-van vak, rār t-ven o law ti, rār m-ron̄ wor sē: o magte so siol dēn ma lēlē lē.

So they crossed that point and continued to fish. Then suddenly they heard some rustling: it was an old woman dragging herself out of her cave.

S17 stop écouter
Ron̄ “Kmur t-ven o sav ti?” Ron̄ “O law. Ngatōlkma ra tbikmār.”

“What are you fishing for?”, she asked. “Blennies”, they replied. “For the two of us, and for our Grandpa.”

S18 stop écouter
O magte nen̄ ron̄ “Ngatōlgēn!”

“Let’s eat them together!” said the old woman.

S19 stop écouter
M-van ma sur rār nen̄, m-la dēn rār o law, ron̄ “Kmur t-gān aksav ti?”

She came closer to them, took the fish from them, and asked “How do you eat them?

S20 stop écouter
Ron̄ “Kmār t-gān qarqar wor ti.”

– We just eat them raw.

S21 stop écouter
Magte ron̄ “Ar la ma!” Ni m-la ma, ni so tul leln̄a bnēn.

– Let me take them!”, exclaimed the old woman, as she suddenly stuck the fish under her armpit.

S22 stop écouter
Ni m-tul leln̄a bnēn, ni so tul kēl nālman gor.

She stuck it under her armpit, and held it with her other hand.

S23 stop écouter
Tōlnēr t-taktak ti; taktak galāg wor, ni m-la kēl dēn o m̄onm̄on leln̄a bnēn, ni m-la ma; ni m-la min rār, titi o law nen̄ va-mnog nok.

They all sat there for a little while, going on with their conversation, and finally she took the food parcel from under her arms, and brought it forward. She gave it to the two boys, who saw the fish was now cooked!

S24 stop écouter
Rār m-gān, rār me-tur ma, tōlnēr ra tbirār m-gān, tbirār ron̄: “Ra tbuk, sa gēn vawē le. Kmur m-la o āv sa ave? O va sa me-mnog!”

They had a bit of it, and went back home with the rest, so they could share it with their grandfather. As soon as the latter tasted it, he exclaimed: “Hey boys, this is delicious! Where did you find that fire? This food has obviously been cooked!”

S25 stop écouter
Rār ron̄ “Vak sa gin magte.”

“We received it from an old woman, over there.” they replied.

S26 stop écouter
Rār / “Ar row kēl, kmur s-la namitōlgēn o āv dēn i magte.”

“Then you should dash back there, and try to steal that woman’s fire for us.”

S27 stop écouter
Rār m-sur-la kēl vak nen̄, rār m-row sē vak, i magte ni m-to kal nok.

Right away they rushed back along the shore – but the old woman had already fled.

S28 stop écouter
Ni m-to srēg tuar masle bē; kma t-var o masle bē nen̄ ti kak ‘Krēwelav’.

She was running upriver along a creek, one we call ‘Krēwelav’.

S29 stop écouter
Rār me-tur o vni mtō, rār me-vrisa sag nen̄, rār sur-bē tētēg ni ti; magte so kal le m̄ōs.

The two boys grabbed a coconut husk and ran after her, following the creek uphill. But the old woman was already entering the forest.

S30 stop écouter
Rār me-tkar ni sur o āv.

They were chasing her to catch her fire.

S31 stop écouter
I magte m-sasiw le masle bē, rār so sasiw le masle bē, magte so kal le m̄ōs.

As she waded across the creek, they followed her – but she had already entered the deep forest.

S32 stop écouter
Tōlnēr me-vrisa sag, vrisa sur bē sag a–van, m-dēn̄ o wasn̄in kma t-var ti kak a Nāvnimtō.

They ran on and on up along the river, until they reached the place we call Navnimto (‘Coconut Husk’).

S33 stop écouter
Rār me-vrisa vasul ni, rār so qāg tus o vni mtō gor na ngon.

As soon as the two boys had overtaken her, they flung their coconut husk at her face.

S34 stop écouter
Magte m-row ma wa magte m-row gās rār, titi o āv so gar gin o vni mtō.

The woman managed to jump out and escape them, but the fire had already caught in the husk.

S35 stop écouter
O wasn̄in nen̄, kma t-var ti ron̄ a Nāvnimtō. Namirār o vni mtō t-tog gēs mlē ti, m-ris vāt.

Remember we call this place ‘Coconut Husk’. And indeed, the two boys’ coconut husk still exists today, after it turned into a rock.

S36 stop écouter
La rār m-la o āv nen̄, rār so mōl kēl ma sur i tbirār.

The boys seized the fire, and brought it back to their grandfather.

S37 stop écouter
Tōlnēr so vōnagav vgar namitōlnēr o āv, tōlnēr t-daw ngatōlnēr o gāngēn ni ti.

The little family was now able to light a fire, which became theirs forever. From that day on, they would always use this fire to cook their food.

S38 stop écouter
La i magte nen̄ ni m-tur a Nāvnimtō, ni so salvut. Ni m-salvut, ni so row tog mke tuar tōw, kma t-var ti ron̄ “a Mke Grāt”.

As for the old woman who was still up at Navnimto, she suddenly took a big leap, and threw herself up to the top of a mountain – the one we call “a-Mke-Ghrāt”.

S39 stop écouter
Ni m-row tog atwal ror, o āv so gān o / o āv m-gān o wavlis, m-gān o dada rga, āv so gān [o rga]…

As soon as she landed, all the vegetation there took fire – grass, leaves, trees, everything was in flames.

S40 stop écouter
Dēkēn, o magte nen̄ ni t-tog t’ a Mke Grāt, a mke tōw, o āv t-gān ti, m-gān sursur nok, ni t-tog mlē ti m-dēn̄ naqri.

Up to this day, that old witch still lives on top of Mount Garet. She has consumed that mountain all the way down to its depths, and is still burning today.

S41 stop écouter
Dōn qōn̄, nēk va-mrōs tektek, nēk s-gav ma mke plēn – oke, nēk s-tek swēl ror: o āv t-qoq ti a mke tōw, kma t-var ti ron̄ a Mke Grāt.

One day, if you want to see by yourself, just board a plane, and then look down: you’ll see a cloud of smoke on top of a mountain – that’s our volcano, Mount Garet.

S42 stop écouter
Ni me-tger wor nok le tan, titi dēkēn ni t-tog mlēti. O tōw nen̄, kma t-var ti ron̄ a Mke Grāt.

She may have sunk into the ground, but she’s still there, inside the volcano.

S43 stop écouter
La magte t-tog t’ a Mke Grāt nen̄, ka ni o āv.

That old woman inside the volcano is no other than Fire.

S44 stop écouter
Ni m-van dēn a le naw, tāre lōmlōmgāv nen̄ rār me-tkar ni, ni m-to dēn rār.

She used to live by the sea, but one day she was chased by two boys and had to run away from them.

S45 stop écouter
Ni gēn so row tog t’ a mke tōw nen̄, a Mke Grāt nen̄, ni t-tog mlēti dēn̄ naqri.

Eventually she threw herself on to the top of that mountain, Mount Garet, and she still lives there to this day.

S46 stop écouter
Dēkēn, nēr m-lēs tuar sas nen̄ nēr t-var ti ron̄ / leln̄a Waetman, t-var ti ron̄ ‘volkenu’. La le na-ln̄akma, le lanwis, kma t-var ti ron̄ “Mke Grāt”.

Nowadays, some people have adopted a word from the language of Europeans: ‘volkenu’. But in our language, in Dorig, the true name of that mountain is “Mke-Ghraat”, Mount Garet.

S47 stop écouter
Sususrig sa ni gēn t-bas gēn t’ aē sa le.

And this is how this story ends.